The Day After Yesterday

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The Day After Yesterday”

We had a few clouds blow into our lives over the past couple of years. Some small, some not so small. Small or large, however, they all seemed like a big deal at the time. Some of these clouds were on my mind this morning when I went out to feed and water the horses. When I walked outside I was greeted by a beautiful sunrise, which reminded me of a lesson I learned long ago but momentarily forgot (if I could remember everything I once knew, I would be a genius). It is commonplace, in times of difficulty, for us to think that things will be better tomorrow.

Or, as “Annie” sings:

The sun will come out tomorrow
So you gotta hang on
’til tomorrow, come what may!
Tomorrow, tomorrow, I love ya, tomorrow
You’re always a day away!”

Tomorrow, the day after today. By definition, however, tomorrow never comes. Even the ever-optimistic Annie admits it… “You’re always a day away!”

So what are we to do? Are we doomed? Nope. You learn to find your Peace, even on a cloudy day. Today. Or, put another way, “The Day After Yesterday”.

Whenever my life gets – how should I put this – let’s just call it …interesting, I have to stop and remind myself that a sunrise is much more beautiful when there are a few clouds around to accent the brilliance and beauty of the sun.

Life is like that too.

I think George Harrison had it more right than Annie:

Here comes the sun
Here comes the sun, and I say
It’s all right.”

This painting of 1949 Chevrolet is one of the first paintings I sold in a professional setting. It was sold years ago as the result of a show at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, a beautiful museum that I highly recommend.

Image and text © 2016 James Golaszewski

Tomorrow” is a song from the musical Annie, with music by Charles Strouse and lyrics by Martin Charnin, published in 1977. The number was originally written as “The Way We Live Now” for the 1970 short film Replay, with both music and lyrics by Strouse.

“Here Comes the Sun” by George Harrison from The Beatles’ 1969 album Abbey Road.

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